Want to poll well? Consider who you vote for when searching for dates

Now, as well as providing dinner party and small talk fodder (and potentially destroying the free world), Trump may also be stopping you from getting a date.
 

According to an article in the Sydney Morning Herald by dating coach Bettina Arndt, political views are now front and centre when it comes to the criteria daters consider when pondering saying yes to a date.


It isn’t just Trump that daters are wary of, Abbott is also considered a turn-off to some. We knew the budgie smugglers would lead to a crash in his personal polls.

“Trump apologists are totally off my radar,” Sam Kurikawa told the Herald. “I also weed out Abbott supporters and Coalition voters. There is no man suave, good-looking or funny enough for me to overlook this gross lapse of judgment,” she explained.

The Melbourne-based 39-year-old explained that she always asks people who they vote for before she agrees to a date, noting that last week she knocked back a dater who said he’d been too busy to have considered what he was going to do in the same-sex marriage vote.

Kurikawa isn’t alone in her approach, with Andrew, a marketing executive having his last relationship cut short because his partner struggled with the fact that he occasionally wrote for conservative magazine ‘The Spectator - Australia’.

Arndt wrote that in her time as an online dating coach those who are most picky when it comes to political preference of a partner are “hard left-wing women,” with some of these women blowing off men "simply because they listen to Alan Jones."

Most, however, take a more realistic approach when it comes to political preferences and dating, with Harold, a 71-year-old lawyer from Melbourne explaining that he’ll only draw a line when it comes to extremist groups.

“I might make an exception for a neo-Nazi or Hansonite,” he said.

Would you say no to a date based on political affiliation? Tell us below?

Please reload