The low down on cushioning and why you shouldn’t do it

Just when you thought the dating lexicon couldn’t get any more complicated, let us introduce a new phrase into the playbook: cushioning.

 

Cushioning has been mentioned extensively in the media in the past few days, with the New York Post saying of the practice that: “Millennials have found a new way to sabotage relationships”, however, while this has a new term, we’re sure it isn’t just millennials who are guilty of cushioning.

 

 

By definition, cushioning is where those in monogamous relationships may flirt with others just in case their relationship falls over, meaning they already have a backup option ready to go.

 

This could be seen as being similar to benching, whereby some singles keep several people on the hook in case their number one doesn’t work out for some reason.

 

Despite this term gaining traction, obviously having someone to ‘cushion’ the blow if your relationship goes sour may seem like a good idea, let us unequivocally tell you that it’s not.

 

 

For starters, if your partner finds out that you’re flirting with other people, it’s likely that you’ll need your cushion sooner than expected. Trust is also crucial in relationships and sneaking around isn’t going build up trust or do anyone any good in the long-run.

 

So, our advice is to focus on the one you’ve got because while the cushion may be soft, the fall-out if discovered, will be anything but.

 

Want more dating terms? Find our dating dictionary here.

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